Proof of Ancient Aliens?

Naram-Sin's "Rocket"

 

Zecharia Sitchin suggests the conical object in the stela below is a rocket.

Unfortunately for this idea, the stela itself is proof against this view. Notice that the stela itself has an inscription on it (the sort of grayish diagonal shading in this picture). To the right are two close ups of the inscription, and to the right of that is the translation (source: William W. Hallo and K. Lawson Younger, Context of Scripture (Leiden; Boston: Brill, 2000), 244).

Notice that the inscription calls this conical shape:  A MOUNTAIN.

Perfectly obvious. Why is it that Zecharia Sitchin couldn't see this in the text?

INSCRIPTION OF NARAM-SIN: CAMPAIGN AGAINST ARMANUM AND EBLA (2.91)

Burkhart Kienast

This inscription was originally carved on the socle of a statue also showing the relief of a city on top of a mountain; it is preserved in three Old Babylonian copies on clay tablets from Ur. Exemplar A contains lines 1118 and the captions describing the city, exemplar B has the lines 119185 and two short captions while exemplar C seems to contain the complete text of A and B; the beginning of C is lost and therefore only a few lines (100106) are parallel with A. The text deals with a campaign of Naram-Sin to northern Syria and with the conquest of Armanum and Ebla.

This inscription was originally carved on the socle of a statue also showing the relief of a city on top of a mountain; it is preserved in three Old Babylonian copies on clay tablets from Ur. Exemplar A contains lines 1118 and the captions describing the city, exemplar B has the lines 119185 and two short captions while exemplar C seems to contain the complete text of A and B; the beginning of C is lost and therefore only a few lines (100106) are parallel with A. The text deals with a campaign of Narām-Sn to northern Syria and with the conquest of Armānum and Ebla.

Summary of the campaign (lines 160)

Concerning the fact from old from the creation of men no one among the kings had overthrown Armānum and Ebla:

With the help of the weapon of Nergal Narām-Sn, the Mighty, opened the only path (there) and he (Nergal) gave him Armānum and Ebla. He also granted him the Amanus, the Cedar Forest, and the Upper Sea. Indeed, with help of the weapon of Dagān, who has made his kingship great, Narām-Sn, the Mighty, conquered Armānum and Ebla. And from the bank of the Euphrates until Ulisum he subjugated the people whom Dagān granted him recently and they now carry the basket (in service) of Abā, his god. Finally, he won control over the Amanus, the Cedar Forest.

Dedication formula (lines 6181)

When Dagān had rendered judgement for Narām-Sn, the Mighty, and given Rī-Adad, king of Armānum, in his hand, so that he (Narām-Sn) himself could take him (Rīadad) prisoner in the midst of his entrance, he (Narām-Sn) fashioned his statue from diorite and dedicated it to Sn.

Declaration of Narām-Sn (lines 82118)

Thus (said) Narām-Sn, the Mighty, king of the Four Quarters (of the world):

Dagān gave me Armānum and Ebla and I captured Rī-Adad, king of Armānum. And at that time I fashioned a likeness of myself and dedicated it to Sn. No one shall remove my name! May my statue stand in front of Sn. What(ever) his god allots to someone may he perform; (but) the task I had to perform was exceeding.



Curse formula (lines 119185)

Whoever removes the name of Narām-Sn, the Mighty, king of the Four Quarters (of the world), and puts his name on the statue of Narām-Sn, the Mighty, saying (it is) my statue, or shows (the statue) to another man saying remove his name and put my name in, may Sn, the owner of this statue, and Itar Annunītum,

An, Enlil, Abā, Sn, ama, Nergal, Ūm, Ninkarak (and) the great gods all together curse him with an evil curse; he shall not hold the scepter for Enlil nor the kingship for Itar; he shall not last before his god; Ninḫursag and Nintu shall not grant him a son or heir; Adad and Nisaba shall not make his furrow prosper; Enki/Ea shall fill his (irrigation) ditch with mud and not increase his understanding.

Captions according to exemplar A: Description of Armānum

(a)     From the strong wall to the great wall:

     130 cubits (is) the height of the mountain,

     44 cubits (is) the height of the wall.

(b)     From the outer wall to the strong wall:

     180 cubits (is) the height of the mountain,

     30 cubits (is) the height of the wall.

(c)     In total: 404 cubits height

     from the ground to the top of the wall.

(d)     He destroyed (?) the city Armānum.